Letters to the Editor

Measure I support
As a teacher in the Gilroy Unified School District and as a
parent of former elementary students in the district, I can testify
that Measure I is a worthy bond measure to support for our
schools.
Measure I support

As a teacher in the Gilroy Unified School District and as a parent of former elementary students in the district, I can testify that Measure I is a worthy bond measure to support for our schools. There are leaky roofs, cafeterias, technology labs, classrooms, schools in need of repair and new ones to be built. All of these house both student activities and whole Gilroy community activities. As in the old days, schools are the center of our town, our futures and our lives. When we go to the ballot box in November, remember what we are responsible for and who we need to ensure the safety and education of – the students. “I touch the future. I teach.”(McAuliffe) Support our students and our future. Vote yes on Measure I in November.

J.A. Tarmann

Gilroy

The last word on evolution

J.G. McCormack lacks for factual knowledge, be it educational, scientific or religious. Leading readers down a deceitful road of untruths and obfuscation, he states that evolution is a religion. Webster’s defines religion: belief in a supernatural power. Evolution, as Mr. McCormack rightly stated, does not need a god. His logic immediately vaporizes when he equates evolution to religion. Where did his rational thought process break down?

Mr. McCormack alludes that 15 percent of parents choose to home-school their children. Comparing his datum with the U.S. Census Bureau’s: 33 million households with children under 18 and .97 children per household equates to 4.8 million students who are being home-schooled. Data from a 1999 report from the National Center for Education Statistics states that 850,000 students are currently home-schooled, or 1.7 percent of all school-level children. With a minor error of over 4 million students, one wonders where Mr. McCormack obtains his information?

Wishing the reader to believe that Darwin proposed a “new and novel concept called Evolution,” Mr. McCormack arbitrarily changes historical science.

Evolutionary concepts predated Darwin by centuries. Charles Darwin and Alfred Wallace jointly submitted a paper to the Linnean Society in 1858 (not 1848, Mr. McCormack), proposing that natural selection might explain the concept of evolution.

Nothing scientific has been proposed to supplant this mechanism, yet anti-evolutionists continue their litany of non-scientific rhetoric, unsubstantiated facts, and innuendos that somehow spills over to social, educational and religious agendas.

Please anti-evolutionists, keep religion out of science, just as science stays out of religion.

Dale Morejón

Gilroy

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