Choice: the greatest blessing of all

Imagine a typical American family sitting down for Thanksgiving
dinner tomorrow, with each one citing a reason for gratitude.
As We See It: The Free Lance

Imagine a typical American family sitting down for Thanksgiving dinner tomorrow, with each one citing a reason for gratitude.

Jim Adams, the father, starts the annual tradition by saying that he is grateful the family is all together and that each member is doing well and is in good health.

His wife, Marilyn, gives thanks for the love and respect that binds the family, and says she is glad that daughter Dorothy was able to be there from college and brought her friend Miriam with her.

Floyd Royster, Marilyn’s father, praises the size of the turkey and the stuffing that fills it. His first memories are of the Depression and he remembers a time when food was not a daily assurance. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II and his thanks include “living in this great country.”

Corrine Royster, his wife, speaks feelingly of the family and how proud she is that her daughter and grandchildren have turned out to be fine people “who walk in the ways of the Lord.”

Her eyes are misty when she finishes, as are the eyes of the other women present.

Dorothy Adams gives thanks for the opportunity to go to college “to enable me to do something worthwhile for others,” and for her friend Miriam coming home with her for the holiday.

Miriam is called upon to say a few words. She is from a European nation that was in the news daily a few years ago and lost her father and a brother to warfare. Her English is very good and her gratitude includes “being with a happy family again, the way it was when I was a girl.”

Finally, it is Johnnie Adams’ turn. At 12, some of his observations border on the impertinent, and his father has already talked to him about it several times.

He sits there, looking at his family members and the visitor until his father says, “Johnnie?”

“I’m sorry; I was getting my thoughts together.” He looks down at the table and says: “I’m thankful that we’ve got a choice – a pretty big one – of things that we can be thankful for. I mean, a lot of people have only got one or two – or maybe none.”

Grandma Royster leans over and places her hand on his cheek as she says, “And now I have another one.”

Whatever you find your blessings to be tomorrow, may they continue and increase through the years.

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