Hitting out of a divot

Don’t you hate it when you hit a perfect drive straight down the
middle of the fairway only to find your ball resting in a divot
hole?
Don’t you hate it when you hit a perfect drive straight down the middle of the fairway only to find your ball resting in a divot hole?

Sometimes a divot was removed by a bird in search of bugs or worms. Sometimes a divot was destroyed by a mower. Most of the time, another golfer was just too lazy to replace the divot.

Although this can can be frustrating, let me help you with this difficult shot.

First, we must evaluate how deep the divot hole is to make a better club selection. Always allow one extra club due to the divot. If the hole is deep, allow two extra clubs for this shots. We want to use more of a “punch shot” out of the divot.

Next, strike the ball with a sharper angle of attack (like you are chopping down on the ball). The ball will fly out a little lower and roll much farther after landing.

Do not worry if the divot will change direction after the shot. The only change in ball flight due to a divot hole will be in the height of your ball. Deep divots can cause the ball to pop up.

There is no need to fall into the trap of hitting the ball harder because it is lying in a hole. Use your same swing tempo and only change your angle of attack.

Plan for your shot to run up to the green rather than fly up to the hole. Look for a safe opening to the green rather than flying over that bunker.

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