Guest View: In response to history, US recalls FDR dimes

Debra Hamilton / AP This undated photo provided by the California Department of Fish and Game shows Zebra mussels next to a dime. Officials say the destructive species has been discovered in California for the first time.

Since they were first minted in 1946 to honor Franklin Delano Roosevelt, four-time elected president of the United States from 1933 until his death in office in 1945, the nation has produced more than 90 billion iconic dimes (10-cent pieces) bearing his likeness.
Now, supporting the highly controversial policy of renaming anything memorializing members of the Confederacy and other related proposals for retroactive Political Correctness such as shunning the Washington Redskins, the U.S. government is proposing a massive recall of all the Roosevelt dimes still in circulation.
This decision to recall the dimes was based on FDR’s racist policies toward the Japanese-Americans, African-Americans and refugee Jews.
Especially reprehensible was the illegal forced relocation and internment of more than 110,000 people of Japanese ancestry from the Pacific coast into harsh remote camps during World War II. Sixty-two percent of the internees were United States citizens.
A second issue was Roosevelt’s failure to racially integrate the U.S. Armed Forces as he finally promised African-American leaders in 1942, in the ninth year of his presidency. Nor did he deliver on that promise for the following three years as president even as Black troops fought and died for the nation. That step came only under his successor, Harry S. Truman, in July of 1948.
Finally, there was Roosevelt’s “anywhere but the U.S.” attitude toward European Jews fleeing the Nazis. Although Roosevelt had Jews in his administration and condemned Hitler, “As the Jewish exodus from Germany increased after 1937, Roosevelt was asked by American Jewish organizations and Congressmen to allow these refugees to settle in the U.S. At first he suggested that the Jewish refugees should be ‘resettled’ elsewhere, and suggested Venezuela, Ethiopia or West Africa…” according to his most famous biographer. As a result few European Jews were allowed to enter the U.S. during this period.
Roosevelt’s reluctance to accept Jewish immigration was based, in part, on strictly political considerations. He was hesitant to antagonize national hero and possible rival Charles Lindbergh and Lindbergh’s followers who agreed with many of the Nazi’s policies of race superiority. It is reported that the government is considering forming a commission to rename Minnesota Airport’s Lindbergh Terminal.
As one Japanese-American, who wished to remain anonymous, said, “I support the decision to recall those coins, every time I see a Roosevelt dime is makes me sick, now I know exactly how African-American soldiers feel when they are stationed at Fort Lee, Virginia or Jews feel when they see the movie “Spirit of St. Louis” re-run on TV.
When asked about other possible changes to U.S. currency in the future, an administration spokesman said, “It’s under review – it’s all under review, God knows we don’t want to offend anyone. Oops, did I say God? Don’t publish that!”
Since they were first minted in 1946 to honor Franklin Delano Roosevelt, four-time elected president of the United States from 1933 until his death in office in 1945, the nation has produced more than 90 billion iconic dimes (10-cent pieces) bearing his likeness.
Now, supporting the highly controversial policy of renaming anything memorializing members of the Confederacy and other related proposals for retroactive Political Correctness such as shunning the Washington Redskins, the U.S. government is proposing a massive recall of all the Roosevelt dimes still in circulation.
This decision to recall the dimes was based on FDR’s racist policies towards the Japanese-Americans, African-Americans and refugee Jews.
Especially reprehensible was the illegal forced relocation and internment of more than 110,000 people of Japanese ancestry from the Pacific coast into harsh remote camps during World War II. Sixty-two percent of the internees were United States citizens.
A second issue was Roosevelt’s failure to racially integrate the U.S. Armed Forces as he finally promised African-American leaders in 1942, in the ninth year of his presidency. Nor did he deliver on that promise for the following three years as president even as Black troops fought and died for the nation. That step came only under his successor, Harry S. Truman, in July of 1948.
Finally, there was Roosevelt’s “anywhere but the U.S.” attitude toward European Jews fleeing the Nazis. Although Roosevelt had Jews in his administration and condemned Hitler, “As the Jewish exodus from Germany increased after 1937, Roosevelt was asked by American Jewish organizations and Congressmen to allow these refugees to settle in the U.S. At first he suggested that the Jewish refugees should be ‘resettled’ elsewhere, and suggested Venezuela, Ethiopia or West Africa…” according to his most famous biographer. As a result few European Jews were allowed to enter the U.S. during this period.
Roosevelt’s reluctance to accept Jewish immigration was based, in part, on strictly political considerations. He was hesitant to antagonize national hero and possible rival Charles Lindbergh and Lindbergh’s followers who agreed with many of the Nazi’s policies of race superiority. It is reported that the government is considering forming a commission to rename Minnesota Airport’s Lindbergh Terminal.
As one Japanese-American, who wished to remain anonymous, said, “I support the decision to recall those coins, every time I see a Roosevelt dime is makes me sick, now I know exactly how African-American soldiers feel when they are stationed at Fort Lee, Virginia or Jews feel when they see the movie “Spirit of St. Louis” re-run on TV.
When asked about other possible changes to U.S. currency in the future, an administration spokesman said, “It’s under review – it’s all under review, God knows we don’t want to offend anyone. Oops, did I say God? Don’t publish that!”

Leave your comments