water resources san benito, drought conditions, water conservation

Bob Tiffany: Supervisor District 4 Candidate

Businessman says Covid-19 recovery is paramount

Bob Tiffany said one thing that’s for sure is that he’s never been a politician. 

“So why am I running for Supervisor in District 4?” he asked. “It comes down to this: I believe San Benito County is at a critical turning point.”

Bob Tiffany

Tiffany—who is one of five candidates for a seat as county supervisor in District 4—said he’s noticed that the county is facing significant challenges right now as they navigate through the Covid-19 pandemic. That includes the enormous impact on the local economy, schools and local families. 

“I felt I needed to step up and further serve my community,” he said.

The 66-year-old Hollister native is currently retired after he managed his family’s business, Tiffany Motor Company, for more than 30 years. He was on the Hollister Downtown Association, a Southside School District Trustee and has been a Community Foundation Board Member since 2003. Other seats he’s held include co-chair of the “Yes on G, Fix Our Roads” campaign and president of San Benito County Business Council since 2015.

Tiffany is a fourth generation San Benito County resident who attended all local schools including San Benito County High. He graduated from Stanford and has a master’s degree from U.C.L.A. He’s married to Kathy and they have two sons, Zach and Nick. 

Tiffany said something he’ll focus on is public safety, which means not only having adequate fire and law enforcement coverage in District 4 but also protecting residents’ health during the pandemic. 

He also wants to tackle economic recovery and development starting with working toward the recovery of the county’s existing businesses from the effects of the novel coronavirus pandemic. 

“But for the economy to fully recover I would also accelerate our efforts to attract new commercial and industrial development and the jobs and sales tax revenue it will bring to our county,” he said. 

Tiffany said that the county has fallen behind in its infrastructure, partly due to residential growth that hasn’t always been properly managed. He insists that any new housing development not only makes sense—and should include more affordable options—but fully mitigates the impact it has on the community.

Tiffany also pointed out that county roads are just now being addressed after several years of neglect but he stressed that much more needs to be done. He said that includes finally dealing with the expansion of Highway 25. 

“Fixing Highway 25 is truly a community mandate,” he said. “I would make this a top priority for our county.”