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August 18, 2022

CSU officials speak out against further cuts

As enrollment increases, the system will see at least $500
million in cuts as state budget remains uncertain
As state legislators work on the 2011-12 budget, the California
State University officials have been speaking out about the
consequences of the current approved $500 million cut to its
2011-12 budget and the ramifications of deeper cuts.
As enrollment increases, the system will see at least $500 million in cuts as state budget remains uncertain

As state legislators work on the 2011-12 budget, the California State University officials have been speaking out about the consequences of the current approved $500 million cut to its 2011-12 budget and the ramifications of deeper cuts.

The cuts come as demand for enrollment is at a peak.

Demand to attend the CSUs, including nearby CSU, Monterey Bay and San Jose State University, is at an all-time high, with the CSU receiving more than 621,000 applications for admission for this coming fall. Of these applications, close to 222,000 will result in admission offers for students.

Without the $500 million budget cut, the campuses could admit an additional 10,000 students.

The CSU expects to enroll approximately 25 percent of the resident first-time freshmen admitted (56,000) and roughly 50 percent of the resident transfer students admitted (45,000). The university estimates that 97 percent of the enrolling freshman class and 96 percent of enrolling undergraduate transfer students will be California residents. Overall, 2011 admissions will increase by more than 30,000 from 2010, with increases in the number of African American (1,250) and Hispanic (17,000) students.

The 2011-12 budget will reduce the CSU’s state support to approximately the same level as in 1999-2000 but the university now serves 70,000 more students. The reduction of $500 million represents a best case scenario for the CSU as proposed cuts could be far greater if the state passes an “all-cuts” budget. Further reductions in state support would force the CSU to consider drastic cost-cutting measures including closing admissions, reducing classes and course offerings, increasing tuition, eliminating programs and services, and reducing the workforce.

Cal Poly Pomona President J. Michael Ortiz participated two weeks ago in a panel discussing the further harm additional cuts to higher education would have on the state as part of a series of budget hearings being held by the Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee. In addition, CSU San Bernardino President Albert Karnig joined California State Assembly Speaker John A. Perez and legislators in Rialto for a budget summit held April 19.

Gov. Brown’s proposed state budget depends on a bipartisan vote to extend several taxes, subject to final approval by the state’s voters. Without these revenues, the governor has repeatedly stated that severe additional cuts to higher education and other programs will be needed to balance the budget. The Governor had already tried to get the extension on a June ballot, but did not receive enough support from the state legislature for the vote.

CSU alumnus Stuart Sunshine, a vice president at the engineering and construction firm, Parsons Brinckerhoff, and a representative of the Bay Area Council, spoke at an April 14 hearing of the state Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee and told legislators that the pipeline of well-qualified graduates to the state’s businesses will be compromised if CSU enrollment is further reduced by an “all cuts” state budget.

CSU Assistant Vice Chancellor for Budget Robert Turnage, also at the hearing, said if the CSU was forced to raise tuition beyond the already approved amount for fall 2011, for the first time students may be paying more than the state contributes for their education.

Other recent CSU advocacy efforts have included the California State Student Association (CSSA)’s lobby day at the capitol April 18 and the Academic Senate’s Legislative Day in Sacramento April 12.

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